Monthly Archive for: ‘January, 2009’

How to take strain off back pain

By Julie DeardorffTribune reporterchicagotribune.comJanuary 14, 2009 Chronic, debilitating back pain often drives adults to explore unconventional treatment options. In 2007, it was the most common reason adults tried alternative methods (17.1 percent), followed by joint pain or stiffness and/or other joint condition (5.2 percent), arthritis (3.5 percent) and other musculoskeletal conditions (1.8 percent), according to the National Center for Complementary …

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The Older Person’s Guide To Joint Replacement

Jan. 13, 2009American Geriatric SocietyStar-Telegram.com Knee and hip replacement can ease pain and improve movement and function in joints damaged by disease or injury. The surgery – in which damaged or diseased parts of the joint are replaced with metal or plastic substitutes – has a very high success rate. That said, there are some risks. A small percentage of …

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For Back Pain Sufferers, Surgery Isn’t Always The Answer

Back pain sufferers can wind up desperate for relief. But just because a treatment is new, expensive or elaborate doesn’t mean it will actually make you feel better. By Amber DanceThe Los Angeles Times January 9, 2009 An aching back — a dull twinge or a stabbing pain, lasting days or years — is a source of annoyance, misery or …

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Maintaining A Healthy Back

January 12, 2009Amber DanceThe Los Angeles Times To maintain a healthy back Four out of five people will experience back pain at some point in their lives, but there are things you can do to avoid or minimize back troubles. Here are some tips: KEEP FIT Maintaining a healthy weight reduces strain on the spine. Walking, swimming and Pilates are …

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Yoga, Massage, Dance Used To Treat Pain

January 9, 2009 By SLOAN BREWSTER, The Middletown Press staff MIDDLETOWN — Some ways to manage pain do not involve medication. Yoga therapist Debra Campagna offers classes for cancer and other patients through Middlesex Hospital. She uses massage techniques developed 4,000 years ago in India that were eventually exported to Thailand. Known as Thai massage, the ancient practice of gently …

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Unique Skeletal Muscle Design Contributes To Spine Stability

ScienceDaily (Jan. 7, 2009) – The novel design of a deep muscle along the spinal column called the multifidus muscle may in fact be key to spinal support and a healthy back, according to researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. Their findings about the potentially important “scaffolding” role of this poorly understood muscle has been …

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Sensory Phantoms: Dealing With The Loss Of A Limb

January 5, 2009By Gloria Troyer CBC News One of the hardest parts of adjusting to an amputation can be the distracting and often painful sensations from nerves that are no longer even there Imagine having an unbearable itch that you absolutely can’t scratch, or a muscle pain you cannot simply knead away. Losing a limb is devastating enough, both physically …

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Wrist Pain Has Many Sources

Ask UT Medicine: Wrist pain has many sources 01/04/2009 Q. My wrist gets a bad pain for no reason. It really hurts for a few days — then it goes away. Do I have arthritis? A. There are many disorders that can cause pain in the wrist, including carpal tunnel syndrome, trigger finger, ganglions, arthritis at the base of the …

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Antioxidants Offer Pain Rrelief In Patients With Chronic Pancreatitis

Convincing evidence to recommend antioxidants for treatment has been lacking American Gastroenterological Association Bethesda, MD (Jan. 1, 2009) — Antioxidant supplementation was found to be effective in relieving pain and reducing levels of oxidative stress in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP), reports a new study in Gastroenterology. CP is a progressive inflammatory disease of the pancreas in which patients experience …

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Pre-Pregnancy Exercise May Not Prevent Back Pain

Wed Dec 31, 2008REUTERS NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Pre-pregnancy physical activity may not influence whether or not a woman will have persistent low back or pelvic pain after pregnancy, suggest researchers from Sweden. However, about half of the women with persistent lower back or pelvic pain 6 months after delivery reported similar levels of leisure-time physical activity as did …

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